Congressman Mark Meadows

Representing the 11th District of North Carolina

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Hurricane Safety Resources

My office is committed to providing you as many resources as possible so that you and your family can stay informed and be prepared during hurricane season. See below for more information from the Congressional Research Service and from NC.gov, and don't hesitate to contact us if you have any questions.

Be sure to log on to readync.org to learn how you can stay informed, make a plan, and take action.

Be Informed

Know what disasters could affect your area, how to get emergency alerts, and where you would go if you and your family need to evacuate. Check out the related links to learn what to do before, during and after each type of emergency (https://www.ready.gov/be-informed)

Plan Ahead

Info from https://www.ready.gov/make-a-plan

Make a plan today. Your family may not be together if a disaster strikes, so it is important to know which types of disasters could affect your area.  Know how you’ll contact one another and reconnect if separated. Establish a family meeting place that’s familiar and easy to find.

Step 1: Put together a plan by discussing these 4 questions with your family, friends, or household to start your emergency plan.

  1. How will I receive emergency alerts and warnings?
  2. What is my shelter plan?
  3. What is my evacuation route?
  4. What is my family/household communication plan?

Step 2:  Consider specific needs in your household.

As you prepare your plan tailor your plans and supplies to your specific daily living needs and responsibilities. Discuss your needs and responsibilities and how people in the network can assist each other with communication, care of children, business, pets, or specific needs like the operation of durable medical equipment. Create your own personal network for specific areas where you need assistance.  Keep in mind some these factors when developing your plan:

  • Different ages of members within your household
  • Responsibilities for assisting others
  • Locations frequented
  • Dietary needs
  • Medical needs including prescriptions and equipment
  • Disabilities or access and functional needs including devices and equipment
  • Languages spoken
  • Cultural and religious considerations
  • Pets or service animals
  • Households with school-aged children

Step 3: Fill out a Family Emergency Plan

Download and fill out a family emergency plan or use them as a guide to create your own.

Step 4: Practice your plan with your family/household

Take Action

Get Involved (Info from https://www.ready.gov/get-involved)

There are many ways to Get Involved especially before a disaster occurs, the content found on this page will guide you find ways to take action in your community. Community leaders agree the formula for ensuring a safer homeland consists of trained volunteers and informed individual taking action to increase the support of emergency response agencies during disasters. Major disasters can overwhelm first responder agencies, empowering individuals to lend support.

Here are some ideas to get you started:

Support your community by participating in FEMA’s individual and community preparedness programs: Citizen Corps, Community Emergency Response Team, Prepareathon, Youth Preparedness

Until Help Arrives

You Are the Help Until Help Arrives (Until Help Arrives), designed by FEMA, are trainings that can be taken online or in-person, where participants learn to take action and, through simple steps, potentially can save a life before professional help arrives. The program encourages the public to take these five steps when there is an emergency.

  • Call 9-1-1;
  • Protect the injured from harm;
  • Stop bleeding;
  • Position the injured so they can breathe; and
  • Provide comfort.

Citizen Corps

The Citizen Corps mission is accomplished through a national network of state, local, and tribal Citizen Corps Councils. These Councils build on community strengths to implement the Citizen Corps preparedness programs and carry out a local strategy to involve government, community leaders, and citizens in all-hazards preparedness and resilience.

Citizen Corps asks you to embrace the personal responsibility to be prepared; to get training in first aid and emergency skills; and to volunteer to support local emergency responders, disaster relief, and community safety.

Community Emergency Response Team

Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) program educates individuals about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations.

Youth Preparedness

As of May 2014, according to the National Center for Education Statistics there is a total of 69.6 million children in school or child care in the United States. Emergencies and disasters can happen at any time, often without warning, where you may not be together with your children.

Starting or getting involved with a youth preparedness program is a great way to enhance a community’s resilience and help develop future generations of prepared adults.

Prepareathon

FEMA’s Prepareathon motivates people and communities to take action to prepare for and protect themselves against disasters. Its chief goals are to increase the number of people who:

  • Understand which disasters could affect their community
  • Know what to do to stay safe
  • Take action to increase preparedness
  • Improve their ability to recover from a disaster
  • Learn more about Prepareathon

Preparing Your Family

You and your family members may not be in the same place when an emergency happens. It is important to plan ahead and talk about what you will do before, during and after an emergency. You need to talk about how will you get to a safe place, get in touch with each other and get back to each other.  https://www.ready.gov/sites/default/files/FamEmePlan_2012.pdf

Your plan should contain:

  • Phone numbers of a pre-assigned contact person for family members to call
  • List of where to find information on shelters (television, radio, this website, ReadyNC mobile app)
  • How to be safe if you stay in your home during an emergency
  • What to do with your pets
  • Thoughts about any older adults or those with functional needs in the home

Mold your plans for your family’s needs. Think about creating a group of neighbors, friends or family to help each other in emergencies. Talk how that group can help each other connect, care for children, pets or other needs.

Knowing how you will respond to an emergency at home, school or work will help you remain calm, think clearly and react well.

Being ready helps you and your family. It also lowers the workload of fire fighters, police and emergency medical workers.

 

Where to Obtain Further Information on Disaster Response

There are available online sources that provide the most immediate disaster response information.